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Title:
Állatorvosi hátterű botanikai vizsgálatok az Állatorvostudományi Egyetem Növénytani Tanszékén 1954 és 2009 között: retrospektív összegzés
dc.contributor.authorVetter, János
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-27T09:46:11Z
dc.date.available2020-11-27T09:46:11Z
dc.date.issued2019-04
dc.identifier.citationMagyar Állatorvosok Lapja 141(4), 245-256. (2019)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10832/2522
dc.description.abstractSUMMARY Since the development of our botanical department (1954), hundreds of botanical analyses have been carried out on various feed samples (hay, silage, haylage, duck-bill and so-called “compact feeds”) and plant composition from autopsy (rumen, stomach, intestinal contents). Based on the remaining documents (which are obviously incomplete) the author summarized the botanical data, the characteristics and consequences of the compositions, as these data could help the veterinarians’ work. In the composition of the hay samples, were often found quality-reducing factors such as a very high proportion of sour-grasses (plant species from families Juncaceae, Cyperaceae, Sparganiaceae and Typhaceae) or too many worthless species of grasses (cockspur, foxtail, Bermuda grass etc.), partial or complete lack of fabaceous plants, or fungal infections. The main lesson of the silage, haylage samples is that the exact implementation of the production method is decisive, and the principle is true today, that good feed can be produced from plant material of good botanical composition. The author introduced the “compact” forages of the 1950s and 1960s. The high proportion of by-products of milling industry (rather waste) also meant many species of toxic weeds, i.e. they were unsuitable for regular feeding at the same time, causing many problems for consumers. In many cases, the botanical composition of animal samples provided important confirmation of the animal health problems that were then assumed. At other times, the sample did not contain any worrying plant constituent, so the examination had to go in a different direction. The above-mentioned lessons are still valid today, indicating that the plant parts (accumulated) in the animal’s body are causally related or may have emerging problems.en_US
dc.language.isohuen_US
dc.publisherMagyar Állatorvosok Lapjaen_US
dc.titleÁllatorvosi hátterű botanikai vizsgálatok az Állatorvostudományi Egyetem Növénytani Tanszékén 1954 és 2009 között: retrospektív összegzésen_US
dc.title.alternativeBotanical examinations of veterinary background at the Department of Botany of University of Veterinary Medicine between 1954 and 2009: a retrospective summaryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMagyar Állatorvosok Lapja 141(4), 245-256. (2019)


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